Scientists at the University of California say that after a study, some specific types of human papillomavirus can increase the risk of contracting HIV infection.

After many years of research, to this day and despite the fact that the relationship between Papilloma and HIV has already been known, the most relevant HPV subtypes to be able to contract HIV had never been accurately identified. The study focused on the 37 most common subtypes and the individual impact of each of said 37 subtypes.

The study involved 600 gay men, bisexual men and other men who have sex with other men and trans women (all of them HIV negative), having fun among them in; men with warts and men without warts. After this classification, a follow-up began that lasted two years in which the scientists were performing control tests for HIV infection once every 6 months. Before carrying out this study, they completed a previous exploration (verified that all of them had one of the 37 HPV subtypes) and a questionnaire, to define what type of sex, frequency, sexual partners, etc.

Throughout those two years, of the 571 people who completed the study, 73 of them finally acquired the HIV virus, which indicates 6% of the total. After further investigation, the scientists concluded that the HPV subtypes with the most influence in contracting HIV were 16,18,31,33,35,52 and 58.

The findings show a strong relationship between certain types of HPV and HIV infection, which would rethink HPV vaccination in gay men, bisexuals and other MSM and in trans women not only for HPV prevention but also for HIV. . This fact should be taken into account by managers of public health programs, who still usually consider the HPV vaccine only in women.

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