If not treated in time, these sexually transmitted diseases can cause inflammation in the fallopian tubes and in the ducts of the testicles

Although gonorrhea and chlamydia are curable Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs), when not treated in time they can progress to cause salpingitis in women (inflammation in the fallopian tubes) and epidymitis in men (inflammation in the internal ducts of the testicles), which causes infertility in both cases. Also, a pregnant woman can cause a preterm pregnancy and intra-amniotic infection (the bacteria in the vagina enter the uterus and infect the tissues surrounding the fetus).

Chlamydia is one of the pathologies, which are generally asymptomatic, to detect gynecologists resort to screening (measurements to establish if the patient is infected). They are fully curable diseases. If they are without any symptoms, to cure them there are treatments that only involve a dose of antibiotics. However, if there is already severe pelvic inflammation, the patient can go to hospitalization to treat this disease with intravenous antibiotics.

Because of this, it is stipulated that between the ages of 21 and 26, each woman, during a visit to her gynecologist, be tested to see if there are signs of gonorrhea and chlamydia; both can be detected in the same test endocervical route, much more effective than looking for it in blood. It should be noted that in a pregnant woman, in your first consultation you must indicate the specific tests for these diseases, since they can infect the creature.

Chlamydia is recognized by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of preventable infertility. In the case of the woman, in an advanced state, she can have varied symptoms, if the condition managed to cause inflammation: she usually gives fever, pain in the pelvis and during sexual intercourse, whose symptoms can be accompanied by vaginal discharge with a bad smell.

There is an important association between chlamydia and Human Papillomavirus (HPV). According to several studies, chlamydia infection is more prevalent in patients with HPV infection, and it seems that it can influence the progression of epithelial lesions caused by HPV, thus indirectly relating to Uterine Neck Cancer (CCU). .

Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Technician and Center Manager, specialist in the field of Sexually Transmitted Diseases for more than 6 years. Awarded in 2018 the Award for Labor Excellence in the field of medicine for his work in charge of the clinic.

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